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44 Gypsy Ln
Bennington, Vermont, 05201
United States

(802)4427158

The Bennington, Fine art sales galleries, Wind Sculptures, Covered Bridge Museum, and a permanent collection of wildlife and Native American art and artifacts

Books

- A selection of books from The Bennington's shop -

The shop features over fifty titles relating to the artists and exhibits on display; contact the shop at 802-442-7158 for more information.

The Hudson River School: Nature and the American Vision - Linda S. Ferber

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The Hudson River School: Nature and the American Vision - Linda S. Ferber

50.00

Hardcover

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In the first half of the nineteenth century, a group of painters working in New York City, together with like-minded poets and writers, developed a distinctly American vision of the landscape. Their powerful interpretations of American scenery, which came to be known as the Hudson River School, tell the story of how landscape imagery can shape both national and cultural identity. These works also demonstrated an early awareness of the importance of preserving natural sites for future generations - from the Hudson River to the Yosemite Valley, from the Arctic to South America.

This volume showcases more than one hundred of these images - many if full-page reproductions that convey the original paintings' monumental scale - as well as two special foldout sections. This marks the first presentation in book form of the New-York Historical Society and features work by all the greatest artists of the group including Albert Bierstadt, Frederic Church, Thomas Cole, Jasper Cropsey, Asher B. Durand, and John F. Kensett. Accompanying a long-term installation, this publication celebrates the four-hundredth anniversary of Henry Hudson's voyage up the Hudson River.

 

"[W]hy should not the American landscape painter, in accordance with the principle of

self-government, boldly originate a high and independent style, based on his native resources?"

Asher B. Durand